Glen Kuban with Acrocanthosaurus track
Main Site, Dinosaur Valley State Park, 1988.

Photo Gallery of Dinosaur Tracks near Glen Rose, Texas

© 2005-2009 Glen J. Kuban (Updated: Aug. 2009)

Part of Kuban's Paluxy Website


This photo gallery is under construction. All photos are copyrighted by me (Glen J. Kuban) unless otherwise noted. Webmasters are welcome to link to these images with credit, but may not publish them or store them on websites or computers without permission. More photos will be added in coming weeks. Please check periodically back to see what's new! Thank you.


The following Link illustrates the major types of dinosaur tracks in Texas, and the location of several tracksites near Glen Rose, which should help the viewer understand the photos that follow.

Major Types of Dinosaur Tracks in Texas

Evidence of four basic track types (and four trackmakers) in Paluxy Riverbed
Evidence of four basic track types (and four trackmakers) in Paluxy Riverbed (Word file)

Overview map of Glen Rose Tracksites



Dinosaur Valley State Park

Dinosaur Valley State Park, near Glen Rose, Texas, has some of the best preserved dinosaur tracks in the world, including what are arguably the best preserved sauropod tracks anywhere. Many are preserved in the limestone floor of the Paluxy river, and occur in the lower part of the Glen Rose Formation (Lower Cretaceous, Albian/Aptian), approximately 110 million years old. The most abundant tracks in the Paluxy are those of theropods (two legged meat-eaters), probably made by Acrocanthosaurus. Others are large four-footed tracks, which were often attributed to the sauropod dinosaur Pleourocoelus but are now associated with the recently erected sauropod genus Paluxysaurus.

Note: The site numbers used here for four primary track sites in the park are those numbers used most recently in park brochures (other site numbers or names were used in the past by the park and other sources). Other track sites within the park, which often are not well exposed are indicated by site names only. Some sites formerly outside the park (such as the Taylor Site) are now within park jurisdiction. For more information about the park facilities and attractions, see my web article "Dinosaur Valley State Park."

"Ballroom" site, South of the Blue Hole (Site #1), 2009

This was the last large area of Dinosaur Valley State Park not yet well mapped prior to 2009. In July of 2009 the Paluxy riverbed dried up almost completely, allowing a track crew (consisting of paleontologist James farlow and seveal of his students, Mike O'Brien of Texas Dept. of Parks and Wildlife, several staff members of Dinosaur Valley State Park, and myself) to clean and document hundreds of tracks in this area, including three sauropod traackways (1 large adult and two juvenile trails), and hundreds of theropod tracks, including many metatarsal tracks, as well as some problematic marks that may have been made by an invertebrate. All of the photos in this section are from the "Ballroom" site except for the first few under the "July 25" link, which show "Dinosaur World"--an expensive walk-through tourist trap of cheesy dinosaur statues (all anatomically incorrect and painted in gaudy colors), which I would not recommend spending money on (Dinosaur Valley State Park, where real dinosaur tracks can be seen in the Paluxy Riverbed, is much more interesting, natural, and educational).

July 24, 2009 photos by Glen Kuban
July 25, 2009 photos by Glen Kuban

Aug. 23-28, 2006


Track Site #1"The Blue Hole" and nearby areas

Opossum Branch (just north of Blue Hole)

Track Site #2 "Main Site"

Track Site #3 "Overlook Site"

Track Site #4 "Denio Site"

Ozark Site (between Main Site and Blue Hole, on the opposite bank from the R.T. Bird site)

Park North-East Site (between Overlook and Denio Site)

"Bend Site" (where Paluxy River turns north into park)

Taylor Site

Note: The Taylor Site was outside Dinosaur Valley State Park until the park acquired the adjoining land in 2004. This site contained the most renown alleged "human" tracks, which are actually infilled metatarsal dinosaur tracks. The infilling material ranges from a bluish-grey (when unoxidized) to rusty-brown (when oxidized).


Sites Near Glen Rose, Outside Dinosaur Valley State Park

Alfred West Site

Baugh/McFall Sites

Glen Rose Town Square


Gallery C: Culpeper, VA dinosaur tracks (lower Triassic)

Updates:
Oct. 2006, GJK
Aug. 2006, GJK
Nov. 2005, GJK
June 2005, GJK